Music session following the 2013 AGM - Hon President Johnny Coppin talking to Jo Heatley

Meetings

The Annual General Meeting of Glos Folk will be held on Thursday July 25th 2019, at The Fountain Inn, Westgate Street, Gloucester at 7.30pm. Everyone is welcome to attend, but only Glos Folk Members may vote. 


Agenda:

1. Appointment of meeting chair
2. Apologies: so far –   – for note
3. Minutes of last meeting (on web at http://www.glosfolk.btck.co.uk/Meetings/2018DraftAGMMinutes for approval
4. Annual Report (on web at www.glosfolk.btck.co.uk/Meetings ) – for approval
5. Financial statement (on web at www.glosfolk.btck.co.uk/Meetings ) – for approval
6. Appointment of new committee (under the Glos Folk constitution, officers are appointed by the new committee at their first meeting) Nominations received from: Bill Craswell (elected 2018) , Astrid Cripps (elected 2009), Bill Taylor (elected 2009), Christine Reynolds (elected 2011), Peter Cripps (elected 2007), Paul Schofield (co-opted 2014, elected 2015) Veronica Lowe (elected 1999). – for vote.
7. Review of Child & Vulnerable Adult Protection/Equal Opportunities & Diversity Policy on web at www.glosfolk.btck.co.uk/ChildVulnerableAdultProtectionPolicy and www.glosfolk.btck.co.uk/EqualOpportunitiesDiversityPolicy  (none required), and appointment of Responsible Officer (Veronica Lowe) - for approval
8. Review of Privacy Statement and Data Protection Policy; (on web at www.glosfolk.btck.co.uk/DataProtectionPolicy ) Appointment of Data Protection Officer (Peter Cripps)- for approval
9. Any Other Business (At the discretion of the chair of the meeting)
 
How Are We Doing?

Glos Folk exists to promote and preserve folk music (song, dance, drama, and customs) from and about Gloucestershire, and from the rest of the British Isles. This folk tradition is part of our national heritage, and is under threat from mainly ‘commercial’ music, and other forms. Since we know that people do like our music when they hear it (which is not often enough!) our strategy for some years has been to do our best to give the general public the opportunity to enjoy traditional music on as many occasions as possible. So, we have a Folk Directory, which lists as many performers as we can, and a Folk Diary, which lists as many performances open to the public as we can find out about.
We also constantly try to contact organisers of events taking place in the county, to try to persuade them to consider engaging local folk singers, dancers, and musicians as part of their offering. In that endeavour we have been quite successful over the years, so Gloucester Tall Ships Festival, Quays Centre Victorian and Christmas Markets, and Cirencester Fleece Fayre have all had Glos Folk members performing for the public.
However, we have not been quite so successful in other parts of the county, particularly Cheltenham, Tewkesbury, and Stroud, so we would welcome knowledge of useful people who run public events in these areas, who we could contact.
Peter Cripps


Glos Folk Treasurer’s Report, Year End: May 31st 2019


We continue to use the donations built up two years ago, and the county folk community gets very good value from Glos Folk. 
There will not be the six pence interest next year; I have moved the tiny amount in what was called a business account into our current account, as I had to spend a silly amount of time trying to prove my ID and get around the fact that we do not have an online business account. 
Historically, the interest paying business account was set up 17 years ago when we were running a print magazine, and had a large lottery grant for a youth music project. It is no longer relevant.


 
                                              Total Assets Brought Forward: £459.71 


Web Hosting July 2018            £25.52                
EFDSS                                     £76.00
                                                                              - £101.52   =     £358.19


Income: Donation from Rod Penlington 
and the Gloucester Diamonds                                                              £15     
Interest                                                                                                  £0.06
                                                      In Bank: £365.00, cash £8.25
              
   Total: At 31st May 2019                               £373.25    


    Veronica Lowe, 
Treasurer, Glos Folk  


Apperley Country Dancing has been running for over eight years now, and attracts a good crowd each month. Most dancers are from outside the village, and there is a fantastic live band, with musicians from several local bands. For the first six years our regular caller was folk stalwart Gerald Tween, but we now enjoy the services of a number of excellent local callers, who come along every few months, and bring a different selection of dances for them and us to try out. (This also keeps the band on their toes, providing suitable music!) Although some of our regulars are folk enthusiasts, most are new to traditional dancing, so we are growing the audience.
The event has developed into a very friendly social event, with lots of laughter. Because it is a day time event, many people come who would find it difficult to attend evening dances.


Astrid Cripps

The Glos Folk Directory web site has had 3253 hits this year—about 62 per week. The most often visited  pages are Dance Bands, Singers/Groups, and Folk Clubs.
The Glos Folk Diary page has had 7731 visits, about 150 per week. (1/3 returning, 2/3 new) The Diary listed a staggering 2885 folk events!  A 25% increase on last year! (Thanks to everyone who sends in information)
Our Facebook page now has 599 members — up 36 on last year. The Mailing List now has 420 members, same as last year. So potentially almost 1000 people        interested in folk! Some overlap, but in excess of 600 by our   reckoning. Over 50 mailings to the membership this year, many of them offering paid             performance opportunities.
The Performers Directory has been cleaned of redundant and duplicated entries, (great work by Bill Craswell!) but still lists 260 performers, teachers, clubs, etc.   Listing is still free at  present, so do let us know about anyone who should be included                                     
                             Peter Cripps

The Mainly English Music sessions continue on Tuesdays. We get folk ring or turn up having seen the Glos Folk website or diary. Our friend Nathan from Canada has appeared again this year. We picked up visitors post Upton Festival who were delaying their return home to come and play. Each week is different as the different venues attract local musicians.
The Folk Clubs at Churchdown, Kempley and Mitcheldean are really well supported with a mix of regular singers and occasional visitors. You hear traditional folk, contemporary standards and singer songwriters with new folk based material, as well as dance tunes, stories, and poems. The audience feedback suggests they all have their favourites and dislikes but generally like the variety on offer.

Gloucester Folk Trail 
The Folk Trail 2019 was a great success with performers and landlords/owners very pleased with the participation. Several Glos Folk Members took part and all are prepared to return should the programmers want them. The committee has already met to revue, and plan for next year’s trail. I am the Glos Folk rep on the planning committee. 

Bill Taylor


Folk music is the greenest music possible. Firstly, it is local. With 600 tunes and 800 songs (according to GlosTrad) collected in the county, nothing has travelled very far, so very few music miles consumed. Contrast that with commercial ‘pop’ music where most of it has travelled across the Atlantic, using thousands of music miles, and classical music, where most of it has travelled from Germany, Austria, Italy etc, again using up thousands of music miles. (Local classical music by Hubert Parry, Herbert Howells, Ivor Gurney etc is hardly ever played)
Secondly, much of it is recycled, with many tunes being used over and over again for songs, and the same songs and tunes played for generations.
Thirdly, it is mostly acoustic, so little electricity used. Many folk musicians paly by ear, so no printing of sheet music.
Fourthly, most folk instruments are wooden, so a very small carbon footprint.
Fifthly, because in the folk world creative people do not dissipate their energy with composition, they can devote all that talent to interpretation, and improving performance, with some left over to solve world problems!
Vote Folk!
Peter Cripps



                                                                                                                                                             









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